Wondering how the autopilot works on an airplane?

Apparently, the autopilot is not as “automatic” as one would think, in the case of piloting an airplane. Basically, there is no robot to take the pilot’s seat and press all the necessary buttons. The autopilot is just a flight control system that allows the pilot to fly a plane without being permanently on hand.

For example, in the case of a flight from New York to Los Angeles, the autopilot system allows the pilot not to sit 6 hours continuously fixed with his eyes and hands on the levers. Basically, it is a self-regulating system that maintains balance. In general, it uses a sensor to receive some kind of data, and the system uses that data to continue operating in a predetermined way.

An automatic flight control system consists of three main parts: a flight monitoring computer, several high-speed processors and a series of sensors placed on different parts of the aircraft. The sensors collect data from the entire plan and send it to the processors, who in turn tell the computer what it is.

But an autopilot will never be able to operate on its own. First, to enter a flight, a route must be created. This route translates into a flight plan, and that flight plan is entered into the computer and connected to the database. However, if the pilot does not know what to do with it, the automatic pilot system cannot be programmed. Basically, the autopilot system only executes the human set flight plan.

And yet, there are errors. Sometimes there may simply be user errors when accessing the flight plan, at other times it may be a sensor or servo failure. Thus, if the autopilot does not do what it was set to do, the pilot will deactivate this system and manually perform the flight.