Vision over airports in future – 2075

Wondering how the world will look like over 70 years ago? What will the airports look like, how will we fly, what other means of transport will we have? A team of students have published a vision for the future, and the winning design is by a student at North Carolina State University Daoru Wang. The designs were presented in the annual competition about the Airport of the future.

The vision of the student, called “Infinity Airport” has won over 10 thousand dollars and the opportunity to receive the prize from Curt Fentress, a prestigious architectural event. In his communication, Wang wrote: “In order to improve the efficiency of the airport typology, this project was subjected to an intensive study of the flow of aircraft traffic and further developed the concept of” managing airport “.

Of course, not only the is design important but also its functionality to the highest standards. The general shape of the airport combines the complexity of the form and the ideology of infinity by creating a circular and endless system.

The project also uses a rail system and a consolidated terminal that explores endless ideas. Aerotropola is a conceptual type of urban form, the airport being the center of the metropolis. It is built in order to bring economic development to the community it serves. It also includes new job creation opportunities for the community it is a part of, where the community is actively involved.

Third, there is a new conceptual design for Heathrow Airport, which is based on a new typology of the airport concept that explores future technological trends and smart cities for direct human connectivity.

At the same time, a concept of “drive-through” located under the airport terminal allows to reduce the traffic of the aircraft and the waiting times. Technological innovations suggest a reduction in physical passports, security and immigration as they move into an online environment.

Finally, during the presentation there were other innovative projects for the future airports, but it remains to be seen how many of them will actually exist in the next decades.